THINGS THAT YOU MAY HAVE MISSED – DECEMBER 8

8th December 2019

PHILIPPINES: HOW DUTERTE EMBRACED THE OLIGARCHS

On 4th December, an article in the Nikkei Asian Review said that during his populist campaign for president in 2015 and 2016, Duterte took aim at the corruption and excesses of wealth-hoarding ruling families.  Despite initial actions, the article says, that Duterte has simply opened the door to a new wave of businesspeople and loyalists, who have been given access to political power and lucrative government contracts.

https://asia.nikkei.com/Spotlight/Cover-Story/Crony-capital-How-Duterte-embraced-the-oligarchs

VATICAN INVESTMENTS LINKED TO GLOBAL MONEY LAUNDERING INVESTIGATIONS

On 8th December, Eurasia Review carried an article saying that a fund in which the Vatican’s Secretariat of State has invested tens of millions of euros has links to 2 Swiss banks investigated or implicated in bribery and money laundering scandals involving more than a billion dollars.  The Holy See Press Office said that “investigations are in progress” regarding the Centurion Fund and other investments made by the Secretariat of State.

https://www.eurasiareview.com/08122019-vatican-investments-linked-to-global-money-laundering-investigations/

WHAT IS SUSTAINABLE AVIATION FUEL (SAF)?

The Blue Sky website carried an article by Air BP’s Commercial Development Manager, Low Carbon.  It explains that SAF stands for “sustainable aviation fuel”, and it is produced from sustainable, renewable feedstocks and is very similar in its chemistry to fossil jet fuel.  Using SAF results in a reduction of CO2 emissions compared to fossil jet fuel over the lifecycle of the fuel.  It goes on to explain that typical feedstocks used are cooking oil and other non-palm waste oils from animals or plants; solid waste from homes and businesses, such as packaging, paper, textiles, and food scraps that would otherwise go to landfill or incineration.  Other potential sources include forestry waste, such as waste wood, and energy crops, including fast growing plants and algae.  Air BP’s BP Biojet and is currently made from used cooking oil and other waste.  He says that SAF can be blended at up to 50% with fossil jet fuel and all quality tests are completed as per a regular jet fuel. Once blended, SAF has the same characteristics as fossil jet fuel and the blend is then re-certified as Jet A or Jet A-1 (as is normal avtur or aviation kerosene, used in jet and turboprop engines) and can be handled in exactly the same way as a regular jet fuel.

https://blueskynews.aero/contributors/What-is-Sustainable-Aviation-Fuel-Tom-Parsons-AirBP.html

 

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